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Indiana Historical Bureau

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  • Purchases may be made via a visit to the shop, by telephone (317-232-2535), fax (317-232-1659), or e-mail (ihb @ history.in.gov). More info on purchasing here.

Parading Patriotism: Independence Day Celebrations in the Urban Midwest

Adam Criblez

Parading Patriotism breaks new ground in revealing how Fourth of July celebrations in the urban Midwest between 1826 and 1876 helped define patriotic nationalism, bringing celebratory actions to life by demonstrating the importance of Independence Day commemorations in defining changing conceptions of what it meant to be an American. The book links two important historical genres by considering how historical memory and American nationalism coalesced on the Fourth of July as Midwesterners used the holiday as a time both to reflect on the past and forge ahead in constructing a unique national identity.

193pp / 2013 / 9780875806921/ $28.95
Order no. 1437

Perimeter: A Contemporary Portrait of Lake Michigan

Kevin J. Miyazaki

Commissioned by the Haggerty Museum of Art at Marquette University to create an artwork reflecting on the importance of freshwater, Milwaukee-based photographer Kevin J. Miyazaki embarked on a two-week, 1,800-mile drive around Lake Michigan. He traveled its perimeter, through Wisconsin, Illinois, Indiana, and Michigan, to produce what he calls “a contemporary portrait of Lake Michigan.” Miyazaki set up his portable studio on beaches, in parks, on boat docks, and in backyards, photographing those he met along the way. From residents, environmental scientists, and artists to a Native American water rights advocate, surfers, and commercial fishermen, Lake Michigan holds a powerful place in the life of each. Many shared their thoughts with him on why this body of water is important to all.

2014 / 9780870206771/ $29.95
Order no. 1439

Lincoln and the U.S. Colored Troops

John David Smith

When Abraham Lincoln issued his final Emancipation Proclamation on January 1, 1863, he not only freed the slaves in the Confederate states but also invited freed slaves and free persons of color to join the U.S. Army as part of the U.S. Colored Troops (USCT), the first systematic, large-scale effort by the U.S. government to arm African Americans to aid in the nation’s defense. By the end of the war in 1865, nearly 180,000 black soldiers had fought for the Union. Lincoln’s role in the arming of African Americans remains a central but unfortunately obscure part of one of the most compelling periods in American history.  In Lincoln and the U.S. Colored Troops John David Smith offers a concise, enlightening exploration of the development of Lincoln’s military emancipation project, its implementation, and the recruitment and deployment of black troops.  

156 pp / 2013 / 9780809332915 / $24.95
Order no. 1436

On the Farm Front:  The Women's Land Army in WWII

Stephanie A. Carpenter

Rosie the Riveter is an icon for women's industrial contribution to World War II, but history has largely overlooked the three million women who served on America's agricultural front. The Women's Land Army sent volunteers to farms, canneries, and dairies across the country, accounting for the majority of wartime agricultural labor. On the Farm Front tells for the first time the remarkable story of these women who worked to ensure both "Freedom from Want" at home and victory abroad.

Formed in 1943 as part of the Emergency Farm Labor Program, the WLA placed its workers in areas where American farmers urgently needed assistance. Many farmers in even the most desperate areas, however, initially opposed women working their land. Rural administrators in the Midwest and the South yielded to necessity and employed several hundred thousand women as farm laborers by the end of the war, but those in the Great Plains and eastern Rocky Mountains remained hesitant, suffering serious agricultural and financial losses as a consequence.  Carpenter reveals for the first time how the WLA revolutionized the national view of farming.

214 pp / 2003 / 9780875803142 / $44.00
Order no. 1438

 

Endangered Species Chocolate

The Indiana Historical Bureau now carries chocolate bars and squares from local manufacturer Endangered Species Chocolate. The company uses ethically-traded cocoa that supports sustainable farming. They also donate 10% of each purchase to organizations that support conservation, preservation and humanitarian efforts such as the African Wildlife Foundation. IHB's Book Shop currently offers 3 oz. bars of four varieties, priced at $3.99.  Bug Bites (0.35 oz) are $0.80.

 

 

 

3 oz. Dark Bar    
Order No. 1391

3 oz. Milk Bar
Order No. 1389

3 oz. Dark w/ Espresso
Order No. 1385

 

 

3 oz. Dark w/ Raspberry
Order No. 1387

0.35 oz. Dark w/ Mint
Order No. 1431

Simply Divine Cookies

Simply Divine is a bakery run by the Sisters of Saint Benedict in Ferdinand, Indiana.  The cookies are made by hand and have the distinction of being juried in as Indiana Artisan products.  IHB's Book Shop currently offers 4 oz. packages of three varieties, priced at $4.95:

     

 Angel Cookies    
Order No. 1415

Ingredients: Flour (wheat flour, malted barley flour, niacin, iron, thiamin mononitrate, riboflavin, folic acid), shortening (soybean oil, hydrogenated palm oil, palm oil, mono-and diglycerides, TBHQ and citric acid added to help protect flavor), sugar, brown sugar, eggs, baking soda, cream of tartar, vanilla, salt

Ginger Snaps
Order No. 1416

 Ingredients: Flour, (wheat flour, malted barley flour, niacin, iron, thiamin mononitrate, riboflavin, folic acid), white sugar, shortening (soybean oil, hydrogenated palm oil, palm oil, mono-and diglycerides, TBHQ and citric acid added to help protect flavor), eggs, sorghum (sorghum, Invert and corn syrup), baking soda, ginger (ginger and sulfur dioxide), cinnamon, salt

Shortbread
Order No. 1417

Ingredients: Flour (wheat flour, malted barley flour, niacin, iron, thiamin mononitrate, riboflavin, folic acid), powdered sugar (cane sugar, cornstarch), brown sugar, unsalted butter (pasteurized cream, natural flavorings [contains milk]), shortening, cornstarch, vanilla

Hoosiers: A New History of Indiana

James H. Madison

Who are the people called Hoosiers? What are their stories? Two centuries ago, on the Indiana frontier, they were settlers who created a way of life they passed to later generations. They came to value individual freedom and distrusted government, even as they demanded that government remove Indians, sell them land, and bring democracy. Down to the present, Hoosiers have remained wary of government power and have taken care to guard their tax dollars and their personal independence. Yet the people of Indiana have always accommodated change, exchanging log cabins and spinning wheels for railroads, cities, and factories in the 19th century, automobiles, suburbs, and foreign investment in the 20th. The present has brought new issues and challenges, as Indiana's citizens respond to a rapidly changing world. James H. Madison's sparkling new history tells the stories of these Hoosiers, offering an invigorating view of one of America's distinctive states and the long and fascinating journey of its people.

424pp / 2014 / 9780253013088 / $35.00
Order no. 1420

The Midwest Farmer's Daughter: In Search of an American Icon

Zachary Michael Jack

From yesterday’s gingham girls to today’s Farmer Janes, The Midwest Farmer’s Daughter unearths the untold history and renewed cultural currency of an American icon at a time when fully 30 percent of new farms in the US are woman-owned. From farm women bloggers, to “back-to-the-land” homesteaders and seed-savers, to rural graphic novelists and, ultimately, to the seven generations of farm daughters who have animated his own family since before the Civil War, the author travels across the region to shine new documentary light on this seedbed for American virtue, energy, and ingenuity.

260pp / 2012 / 9781557536198 / $21.95
Order no. 1371

Lincoln's Censor: Milo Hascall and the Freedom of the Press in Civil War Indiana

David W. Bulla and Justyna Sempruch

'Lincoln's Censor' examines the effect of government suppression on the Democratic press in Indiana during the spring of 1863. Lincoln, who suspended the writ of habeas corpus in 1862, had some misgivings about theintimidation of Democratic newspapers, but let the practice continue in Indiana until June 1863.

190pp / 2008 / 9781557534736 / $39.95
Order no. 1374

Spacewalker: My Journey in Space and Faith as NASA’s Record-Setting Frequent Flyer

Jerry L. Ross and John Norberg

The majority of the book is an insider’s account of the US Space Shuttle program, including the unforgettable experience of launch, the delights of weightless living, and the challenges of constructing the International Space Station. Ross is a uniquely qualified narrator. During seven spaceflights, he spent 1,393 hours in space, including 58 hours and 18 minutes on nine space walks. Life on the ground is also described, including the devastating experiences of the Challenger and Columbia disasters.

For readers who have followed the space program from Mercury through the International Space Station and wonder what comes next, this book provides fascination; for young people interested in space exploration and reaching for their dreams, whatever they might be, this book provides inspiration. Full of stories of spaceflight that few humans have ever experienced, told with humor and honesty, Spacewalker presents a unique perspective on the hard work, determination, and faith necessary to travel beyond this world.

320pp / 2013 / 9781557536310 / $29.95
Order no. 1370

The Dean's Bible: Five Purdue Women and their Quest for Equality

Angie Klink

Like pearls threaded one-by-one to form a necklace, five women successively nurtured students on the Purdue University campus in America’s heartland during the 1930s to 1990s. Individually, each became a legendary dean of women or dean of students. Collectively, they wove a sisterhood of mutual support in their common—sometimes thwarted—pursuit of shared human rights and equality for all.

While it is focused on changing attitudes on one college campus, The Deans’ Bible sheds light on cultural change in America as a whole, exploring how each of the deans participated nationally in the quest for equality. The story rolls through the “picture-perfect,” suppressive 1950s; explores the awakening 1960s of women’s liberation; describes the challenging 1980s, with AIDS and alcohol epidemics; and sails into the twenty-first century as a United States Coast Guard cutter is named after Dorothy Stratton and commissioned by First Lady Michelle Obama.

As each woman succeeded the other, forming a five-dean friendship, they knitted their bond with a secret symbol—a Bible. Originally possessed by Purdue’s first part-time Dean of Women Carolyn Shoemaker, the Bible was handed down from dean to dean with favorite passages marked. The lowercase word “bible” is often used in connection with reference works or “guidebooks.” The Deans’ Bible is just that, brimming with stories of courageous women who led by example and lived their convictions.

 504pp / 2014 / 9781557536761 / $29.95
Order no. 1373

The Boy Who Invented Television: A Story of Inspiration, Persistence, and Quiet Passion

Paul Schatzkin

While the great minds of science, financed by the biggest companies in the world, wrestled with 19th century answers to a 20th century problem, Philo T. Farnsworth, age 14, dreamed of trapping light in an empty jar and transmitting it, one line at a time, on a magnetically deflected beam of electrons. Philo Farnsworth was a self-educated farm boy from Rigby, Idaho, when he first sketched his idea for electronic television on a blackboard for his high school science teacher. Six years later, while competitors still struggled with mechanical television systems, Farnsworth successfully demonstrated his invention. He was 21. In 1930, Farnsworth was awarded the fundamental patents for modern television. He spent the next decade perfecting his invention, fighting off challenges to his patents by the giant Radio Corporation of America and defending his vision against his own shortsighted investors who did not share his larger dream of scientific independence. The Boy Who Invented Television traces Farnsworth's "guided tour" of discovery, describing the observations he made in the course of developing his initial invention, and revealing how his unique insights brought him to the threshold of what might have been an even greater discovery-clean, safe, and unlimited energy from controlled nuclear fusion.
296 pp / 2004 / 9780976200000 / $16.00 
Order no. 1381

Lapel Pins

These custom pins were designed in-house and produced exclusively for IHB by Indiana Metalcraft in Bloomington, Indiana. They are both about 1" tall.  The state pin is gold-tone with enamel, and the heavy, pewter pin features a detailed State House dome (click here to see the detail).

   

Enamel Pin
$4.99
Order no. 1350 

 Pewter Pin
$10.99
Order no. 1351

 

Johnny Appleseed and the American Orchard: A Cultural History

William Kerrigan

Johnny Appleseed and the American Orchard illuminates the meaning of Johnny "Appleseed" Chapman's life and the environmental and cultural significance of the plant he propagated. Creating a startling new portrait of the eccentric apple tree planter, William Kerrigan carefully dissects the oral tradition of the Appleseed myth and draws upon material from archives and local historical societies across New England and the Midwest.

The character of Johnny Appleseed stands apart from other frontier heroes like Davy Crockett and Daniel Boone, who employed violence against Native Americans and nature to remake the West. His apple trees, nonetheless, were a central part of the agro-ecological revolution at the heart of that transformation. Yet men like Chapman, who planted trees from seed rather than grafting, ultimately came under assault from agricultural reformers who promoted commercial fruit stock and were determined to extend national markets into the West. Over the course of his life John Chapman was transformed from a colporteur of a new ecological world to a curious relic of a pre-market one.

248 pp / 2012 / 9781421407296 / $25.00
Order no. 1361

Indianapolis Colts: The Complete Illustrated History

Lew Freedman

This fully illustrated history of the Indianapolis Colts celebrates the football team from its origins in Baltimore through the past three decades in Indianapolis. With fascinating stories and in-depth analysis, author Lew Freeman highlights Pro Football Hall of Famers such as the legendary Johnny Unitas, Raymond Berry, John Mackey, Gino Marchetti, Lenny Moore, Eric Dickerson, and Marshall Faulk. Coaches Don Shula and Tony Dungy are also featured prominently, as are the Irsay family and recent stars such as Peyton Manning, Marvin Harrison, Reggie Wayne, Dwight Freeney, Robert Mathis, and Andrew Luck.

224 pp / 2013 / 9780760343302 /$35.00
Order No. 1363

Weird Indiana: Your Travel Guide to Indiana’s Local Legends and Best Kept Secrets

Mark Marimen et al.

Weird Indiana is here to prove that the Crossroads of America, as our state motto claims, is also the Crossroads of the Weird! There's such an abundance of weirdness here that it took three authors to showcase all the odd and offbeat wonders the Hoosier State has to offer. Our authors, Mark Marimen, Jim Willis, and Troy Taylor, set off with cameras and notepads in hand, in search of Indiana's best kept secrets, local legends, bizarre beasts, and more, and they found it—in spades!

Sit back and enjoy a relaxing picnic in Shades of Death Park; “see the light” if you're lucky enough to witness those unexplained glowing spots known as Moody's Light. Find out how a town named Santa Claus became involved in one of the fiercest rivalries in the state's history. Slap on another layer of color to the world's biggest ball of paint, and no, you're not seeing things—that really is an enormous pink-spectacled elephant drinking a martini on the side of the road! Get the time from an enormous leg sundial, and listen for the whistle of terror on the White Lick Creek Bridge, but whatever you do, don't answer an ad from La Porte's Black Widow. Make a person-to-person call from inside a tomb, and meet Indiana's most upright citizen, buried that way for almost two hundred years. Check out the ruins of Littleville, where 125 miniature buildings once stood—complete with a courthouse, and even a yacht club, all of eighteen inches tall.

253 pp / 2008 / 9781402754524 / $14.95
Order no. 1360

Washed Away: How the Great Flood of 1913, America's Most Widespread Natural Disaster, Terrorized a Nation and Changed it Forever

Geoff Williams

The incredible story of a flood of near-Biblical proportions—its destruction, its heroes and victims, and how it shaped America’s natural-disaster policies for the next century. The storm began March 23, 1913, with a series of tornadoes that killed 150 people and injured 400. Then the freezing rains started and the flooding began. It continued for days. Some people drowned in their attics, others on the roads when they tried to flee. It was the nation’s most widespread flood ever—more than 700 people died, hundreds of thousands of homes and buildings were destroyed, and millions were left homeless. The destruction extended far beyond the Ohio valley to Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Nebraska, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Arkansas, Louisiana, Kentucky, West Virginia, New York, New Jersey, and Vermont. Fourteen states in all, and every major and minor river east of the Mississippi. In the aftermath, flaws in America’s natural disaster response system were exposed, echoing today’s outrage over Katrina. People demanded change. Laws were passed, and dams were built. Teams of experts vowed to develop flood control techniques for the region and stop flooding for good. So far those efforts have succeeded.It is estimated that in the Miami Valley alone, nearly 2,000 floods have been prevented, and the same methods have been used as a model for flood control nationwide and around the world.

400 pp / 2013 / 9781453271636 / $16.95
Order no. 1364

The Fault in Our Stars

John Green

Despite the tumor-shrinking medical miracle that has bought her a few years, Hazel has never been anything but terminal, her final chapter inscribed upon diagnosis. But when a gorgeous plot twist named Augustus Waters suddenly appears at Cancer Kid Support Group, Hazel’s story is about to be completely rewritten.

Insightful, bold, irreverent, and raw, The Fault in Our Stars brilliantly explores the funny, thrilling, and tragic business of being alive and in love.

352 pp / 2012 / 9781101569184 / $12.99
Order no. 1379 

Slaughterhouse-Five

Kurt Vonnegut

This is one of the world’s great antiwar books. Centering on the infamous firebombing of Dresden, Billy Pilgrim’s odyssey through time reflects the mythic journey of our own fractured lives as we search for meaning in what we fear most.

215 pp / 9780440180296 / $17.60
Order no. 1377 

Cat’s Cradle

Kurt Vonnegut

Kurt Vonnegut’s satirical commentary on modern man and his madness. An apocalyptic tale of this planet’s ultimate fate, it features a midget as the protagonist, a complete, original theology created by a calypso singer, and a vision of the future that is at once blackly fatalistic and hilariously funny. A book that left an indelible mark on an entire generation of readers, Cat’s Cradle is one of the twentieth century’s most important works—and Vonnegut at his very best.

285 pp / 9780385333481 / $15.00
Order no. 1378 

Women Invent! Two Centuries of Discoveries That Have Shaped Our World

Susan Casey

These inspiring stories of women inventors take the reader through the process of inventing--from coming up with an idea to having it manufactured and sold.

144 pp / 1997 / 9781569765111 / $16.95
Order no. 1357
 

Insiders' Guide to Indianapolis

Jackie Sheckler Finch

A first edition, Insiders' Guide to Indianapolis is the essential source for in-depth travel and relocation information to Indiana's capital city. Written by a local (and true insider), this guide offers a personal and practical perspective of Indianapolis and its surrounding environs.
240 pp / 2010 / 9780762762293 / $18.95
Order no. 1365

Preserving the Family Farm: Women, Community, and the Foundations of Agribusiness in the Midwest, 1900-1940 

Mary C. Neth
Between 1900 and 1940 American family farming gave way to what came to be called agribusiness. Government policies, consumer goods aimed at rural markets, and the increasing consolidation of agricultural industries all combined to bring about changes in farming strategies that had been in use since the frontier era. Because the Midwestern farm economy played an important part in the relations of family and community, new approaches to farm production meant new patterns in interpersonal relations as well. In Preserving the Family Farm Mary Neth focuses on these relations—of gender and community—to shed new light on the events of this crucial period.
368 pp / 1998 / 9780801860614 / $28.00
Order no. 1362