IN.gov - Skip Navigation

Note: This message is displayed if (1) your browser is not standards-compliant or (2) you have you disabled CSS. Read our Policies for more information.

Amber Alert
Amber Alert - TEST
  • Facilities
  • Locate an Offender
  • Division of Youth Services
  • Weekly Views
  • Indiana Savin
  • Alert
  • widget7

Indiana Department of Correction

IDOC > Programs Programs

AA/NA/CMA (Alcoholics Anonymous, Narcotics Anonymous and Crystal Meth
Anonymous programs are those which are best described as self help and supportive in nature. Volunteers come into the DOC facilities and share their life story that includes addiction to a drug along with examples of recovery implementation that the offenders can use in their lives. These are available in all IDOC Facilities.

CLIFF (Clean Lifestyle is Freedom Forever)
CLIFF is a modified Therapeutic Community designed specifically for those whose lives are impaired by methamphetamine. The program is a minimum of 8 months of intensive cognitive behavioral, evidenced based best practice counseling. Offenders are exposed to up to 12-15 hours each day of programming to specifically assist them to recover from the addiction, build social skills acceptable in society as well as job interviewing skills to help with their employment. Further, the offenders work on peer and personal relationship skills to better assist in their recovery when released to their respective communities. There are two male units that are 200 and 156 beds respectively, and one female 100 bed unit. The CLIFF Units have demonstrated a positive impact on both recidivism and conduct. Recidivism rates are nearly ½ that of the Departments overall recidivism for those offenders that successfully complete the program. Conduct rates on the CLIFF Unit are about 1/10 that of a general population housing unit. During 2009, 371 offenders successfully completed the CLIFF Programs.

College Degree Programs

U.S. Department of Labor (USDOL) Apprenticeship Program
The partnership between the U.S. Department of Labor’s Office of Apprenticeship and the Indiana Department of Correction has developed into the largest prison apprenticeship training program in the country today. The program, now entering its 6th year, continues to show strong growth both in number of apprentices and apprentice graduates. Registered Apprenticeship programs meet the skilled workforce needs of Indiana’s businesses by training qualified individuals for lifelong careers. Skills such as traditional construction and manufacturing, as well as new emerging industries like information technology, energy, telecommunications and more are being learned inside Indiana’s prisons. Apprenticeship provides a structure whereby one can obtain work habits and skills that will be attractive to potential employers, and open the door to meaningful occupations and long-term success. USDOL Apprenticeship has provided opportunity to millions of Americans for over 70 years.  With over 250,000 sponsors supporting over 30,000 different Registered Apprenticeship programs across the country, Apprenticeship we will continue to work to create employment opportunities for all Americans.

Dog/Cat Rescue Projects
Several Facilities have started dog and cat rescue projects. They are typically in conjunction with local animal shelters, and are designed to rescue animals that can be difficult to adopt. Offenders work with the animals to help make them more adoptable pets. This helps impact offender idleness. The goal is to then get the pets united with owners in the community. This project helps to rescue hundreds of animals each year and the offender population is providing a service that gives back to the communities.

GED Instruction
The Department’s research provides a clear message that obtaining a GED while incarcerated cannot be counted upon as a sole ticket out of poverty. However, post-secondary education and training programs are denied to uncredentialed drop outs, but available to GED holders. To the extent that post-secondary education and training provide increased opportunities of employment and subsequent wage gains, the GED functions as a gateway to employment and possible reductions in recidivism. While it is an expensive endeavor to categorize employers’ reactions to GED holders, it appears that Indiana employers accept the GED certificate as a signal of an applicant’s motivation, commitment to work, and other productive attributes. During the prior school year 1,059 incarcerated adults successfully completed the requirements of the program.

ICAN (Indiana Canine Assistant, Inc.)
ICAN’S mission is to provide rehabilitation and education to adult offenders as we train assistance dogs for children and adults with physical/developmental disabilities. The program is located at three IDOC facilities and currently has two full-time and three part-time staff. They rely extensively on volunteers.ICAN, Inc. is a 501©3 not –for-profit organization incorporated in the state of Indiana. ICAN is one of only three assistance dog prison affiliated programs in the US, where the clients with disabilities come to the prison for the training necessary to successfully work with their new service dog. This model requires offender/handlers to receive a one year curriculum that addresses: mobility and cognitive issues presented by people with different disabilities (i.e. autism, CP, MD, Brain injury); teaching strategies most aligned with different impairments; theories of motor learning and motivation as it relates to people and dogs.ICAN differs from most other prison programs that offer dog training for several reasons. These include: 1. An emphasis on offender education, character development and job readiness skills. 2. Most prison based dog programs focus on pet dog placements. ICAN’s training of assistance dogs typically takes two years and requires handlers to teach a dog over fifty commands. The theoretical and technical proficiency needed to train assistance dogs is much greater than that to teach more basic obedience. 3. During 2009, the ICAN Program became an approved Department of Labor (D.O.L) Apprenticeship Program. This enables the offenders who successfully complete the course to receive a D.O.L Certificate, and also obtain a time cut.

INSOMM (Indiana Sex Offender Management and Monitoring Program)
The Indiana Sex Offender Management and Monitoring (INSOMM) Program provides an integrated continuum of sex offender specific services, beginning within IDOC correctional facilities, proceeding through the re-entry process, and continuing in communities across the state. Community programming operates utilizing the "Containment Model". This consists of a team that monitors each sex offender’s activities and programming during their Parole Supervision. The team consists of the INSOMM Program Parole Agent, treatment provider, polygraph examiner, and the INSOMM Program District Coordinator. The primary goal of the program is to enhance public safety by reducing recidivism in convicted sex offenders.

Literacy Education
Thirty-four percent of the Department’s adult population is functionally illiterate. On-going research has found that ex-offenders who are employed post-release are less likely to recidivate. Increasing educational attainment while incarcerated holds the promise of increasing employment opportunities at sustainable wages and ending a repetitive cycle of involvement in the State’s criminal justice system. Indiana’s Correctional Education programs begin with a strong commitment of resources to basic reading, mathematics, and language arts. During School Year 2010/2011,  764 offenders demonstrated mastery above the sixth-grade level at the time of completion.

MPOP/SPOP
The Standardized Pre-Release Orientation Program (SPOP) is the basic Pre-Release Re-Entry program provided to most offenders. This program shall consist of a 65-hour core curriculum and at least an additional 15-hour curriculum determined by each facility Re-Entry Coordinator. The SPOP is presented in a group setting. All offenders shall be assigned to a Pre-Release Re-Entry program within one year prior to their release from the Department to allow the offender to complete the appropriate components of the program. Every effort shall be made to retain the offender in the program until completion. This is available in all IDOC Facilities, except for Work Release centers.

Offender Identification Assistance
In 2009, the IDOC and the Bureau of Motor Vehicles partnered in assisting offender in obtaining a state identification prior to release. The BMV allow their mobile unit to visit several of our facilities to assist offenders in having a state identification when they were release from our facilities. BMV stated, "During 2009, in 19 days at Dept. of Correction facilities, we were able to distribute 1,971 ID cards to offenders."

Outpatient Substance Abuse Program
The Out-Patient Substance abuse program consists of three Phases.  Phase 1 is a guided self-study that is a basic drug education manual.  Phase 2 is Cognitive-Behavioral treatment that is evidence based and based on "Best Practices".  The Federal Bureau of Prison material is utilized in their Phase as well as Dr. Stanton Samenow's "Commitment to Change".  Phase 3 is a 3 segment program based on Relapse Prevention and Re-Entry into society.  The 12 Steps are covered as well as TCU Straight Ahead material. These are located at all IDOC facilities. Over 9400 offenders participated in either CLIFF, TC’s or Outpatient Substance Abuse Programs during 2009.

PLUS Unit
The Purposeful Living Units Serve (PLUS) program is a faith- and character-based community that encourages offenders to choose alternatives to criminal thinking and behavior by providing a focus on spiritual and character development, life-skills training community service, and intentional preparation for living as law-abiding citizens. Key components of the program include a strong positive peer culture a curriculum that addresses risk factors and establishing a mentoring relationship with a positive role model volunteer from the community. Now in its fourth year, the PLUS program is offered at 16 different facilities with a current enrollment of approximately 1,200 participants. Since its inception, over 1,000 PLUS participants have completed the 12-16 month program. Of these, around 200 have been released back into the community. The current return rate of PLUS graduates is less than 5%, compared with the overall recidivism rate of 37%. In 2009, PLUS was nationally recognized by the American Correctional Chaplains Association by receiving their Offender Program of the Year award.

PREP
The Prevention and Relationship Enhancement Program (PREP) encourages offenders to maintain and strengthen ties with their families by providing tools for positive communication. The program is presented to offenders and their spouses in a two-day weekend seminar which addresses common roadblocks to healthy communication. In 2009, over 200 couples participated in the program. The PREP program is funded by a federal grant from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Family Assistance. IDOC is one of the national leaders in providing offenders with better family skills, and is the first Department of Correction to implement the new PREP Inside and Out curriculum, which was designed specifically for use in a correctional setting.

Prison Tails
This program works with local community animal shelters to provide programs that provide training to dogs that will help them be adopted.  For the offender, this program enhances life skills preparing them for release. This program has also become an approved Department of Labor (D.O.L) Apprenticeship Program. This enables the offenders who successfully complete the course to receive a D.O.L Certificate, and also obtain a time cut.

Responsible Fatherhood Program
The Responsible Fatherhood Program utilizes nationally recognized curricula to provide offenders with the skills to be better fathers. The program uses materials from National Fatherhood Initiative, including 24/7 Dad and Inside Out Dad, to provide offenders with skills to be better role models for their children. The program encourages offenders to develop and maintain stronger ties with their families, which has a positive impact on recidivism. The Responsible Fatherhood Program is funded by a federal grant from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Family Assistance. In 2009, over 1,000 offenders participated in the program.

Shifting Gears
Shifting Gears is a bicycle restoration located at Pendleton Correctional Facility. Offenders are kept busy rebuilding and refurbishing bikes. The community receives the benefits as community agencies can provide bicycles for kids and adults who have need for transportation. Shifting Gears refurbished 453 bikes in 2009, and donated 623 to people in need.

Substance Abuse
The Indiana Department of Correction's Substance Abuse Program has adopted the mission to provide effective substance abuse treatment in all of our facilities in order to reduce offender substance abuse, thus increasing their potential for successful reintegration into society. We provide assessments, education, treatment, and referrals appropriate to each offender's individualized needs within the constraints of available resources. We continue to develop and maintain a continuum of care, including linkages to the community.

Those who desire treatment must complete a request form, as treatment is voluntary. They will be admitted strictly by the order of their Earliest Possible Release Date (EPRD) with those offenders having the shorter amount of time first. Offenders must have sufficient time (determined by the facility) to complete the program to be enrolled. Those with insufficient time will be referred to a provider in their parole district for their treatment. The Admission Criteria includes:

  1.  A documented significant history of substance abuse.
  2. Offenders will be admitted based upon their EPRD. Offenders who have started a program at one facility and are transferred to another facility will be placed at the top of the waiting list at the receiving facility unless they are disciplinary transfers, who must wait a minimum of 6 months to enter treatment.
  3. Transferred offenders with more than 2 years until their EPRD may be denied immediate access to services if their inclusion would prevent offenders with less than 2 years from receiving services.
  4. Offenders must be willing to sign and adhere to a behavioral contract, which includes a willingness to complete all homework assignments.
  5. Offenders demonstrating their only motivation for treatment is to receive a time cut, may be denied services.
  6. Offenders in treatment are subject to urine drug screens at any time.

A complete detailed list of the criteria is posted in all of the dormitories and is also available from the Substance Abuse Coordinator at each site.

Those offenders who successfully complete the Indiana Department of Correction substance abuse treatment program may receive time cuts totaling up to six months. To be eligible for the time cuts you must:

  1. Be in Credit Class 1 at the time of program completion;
  2. Have one year clear of any Class A conduct reports at the time of completion;
  3. Have one year clear of two Class B conduct reports at the time of completion; and
  4. Have one year clear of being found guilty as a Habitual Rule Violator.

12-Step support groups are available to all offenders at most sites throughout the State; however participation in these groups will not qualify or count toward achieving a time cut.

Therapeutic Communities (TC)
The Department’s TC’s are specialized intensive therapeutic communities designed to treat offenders with severe drug addictions.  The program is a minimum of 8 months of intensive cognitive behavioral, evidenced based best practice counseling.  Clients are exposed to up to 12-15 hours each day of programming to specifically assist the client to recover from the addiction, build social skills acceptable in society as well as job interviewing skills to help with their employment.  Further, the clients work on peer and personal relationship skills to better assist in their recovery when released to their respective communities. The IDOC TC’s are at 5 facilities, and total nearly 1200 treatment beds. The TC’s demonstrated a positive impact on both recidivism and conduct. Recidivism rates are nearly ½ that of the Departments overall recidivism for those offenders that successfully complete the program. Conduct rates on the TC’s are about 1/10 that of a general population housing unit. During 2209 773 offenders successfully completed the TC Programs.

Thinking for a Change
The Department utilizes Thinking for a Change version 3.0 (T4C 3.0).  T4C 3.0 is an innovative, evidence-based cognitive behavioral curriculum from the National Institute of Corrections (NIC) that has broadly influenced the correctional field and the way correctional facilitators work with offenders.  Studies have shown that, when implemented with integrity, it can reduce recidivism among offenders. Lessons focus on the development of social and problem solving skills.   IDOC currently has over 200 certified T4C facilitators.

Thoroughbred Horse Retirement
This program helps end needless abuse and slaughter of retired race horses by providing humane, viable rescue programs, including permanent retirement and private adoption for thoroughbreds at the end of their racing careers. Offenders are taught equine skills and not only maintain these animals, but also help retrain them so they are suitable for use in qualified handicapped and other therapeutic riding programs. The Equine Program is located at Putnamville Correctional Facility. The project currently houses 33 horses, 4 of which were rescued this year. Eleven horses have been adopted into the community. These horses are generally adopted by individual persons for their own personal use or to go on for a second career.

Vocational Education
The Department with the guidance of the Indiana Department of Workforce Development provides vocational programs ranging from Auto Body to Welding throughout the state’s adult system. Instructors are typically certified as occupational specialists by the Indiana Department of Education. 4,237 offenders enrolled in these programs during the School Year 2008/2009 with 2,133 receiving recognized certifications upon completion.